@jamesmullarkey "As we clearly state each time you open a new incognito tab, websites might be able to collect information about your browsing activity".

How incredibly disingenuous. That's very different than "we help websites collect information about your browsing activity."

@freakazoid

Also the whole "we need to collect data for your own benefit" nonsense

Through the book at them

@freakazoid @jamesmullarkey These are separate Google products though: Chrome, being the user agent, ensures that that the incognito session doesn't leak cookies or other personal information to websites. Analytics, though, is a tool for webmasters, and works just like any other tool for analyzing visits to websites.

If you visit codewiz.org, I will log your IP. It's the default setup of *all* webservers, and works this way regardless of incognito mode.

@codewiz @jamesmullarkey Are you saying that the lawsuit is over the fact that Chrome's incognito mode doesn't hide your IP address? From reading the article and seeing Google's responses, that seems unlikely.

@freakazoid @jamesmullarkey The article deliberately leaves this point vague. From this, even readers who aren't normally paranoid will imagine that there's a collusion between two Google products, in which Chrome leaks information about the user identity directly to Analytics.

This is a common trick to mislead the public used by bloggers with a political agenda.

A journalist in good faith would have *at least* linked to the public court records, so that anyone could read the details.

@freakazoid @jamesmullarkey Reuters has a more detailed article with this reference at the end:

The case is Brown et al v Google LLC et al, U.S. District Court, Northern District of California, No. 20-03664.

reuters.com/article/us-alphabe

@freakazoid @jamesmullarkey How does it work, these days? Do we still need to install RECAP to get around the paywall on public records of US federal courts? :troll:

YES! What a scam:

"Access to case information costs $0.10 per page. The cost to access a single document is capped at $3.00, the equivalent of 30 pages."
pcl.uscourts.gov/pcl/index.jsf

I'm sorry, but we'll never find out the truth! :troll: :troll: :troll:

@freakazoid @jamesmullarkey

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